Learning CPR Can Save Your Cat’s Life

cat taking care of his pal
cat taking care of his pal
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

CPR is needed when for reasons including shock, drowning, choking, injury or disease your cat’s heart and breathing stops. Specifically CPR, or cardiopulmonary resuscitation, is when artificial breathing techniques are combined with techniques to massage or restart the heart. Generally when breathing stops the heart will soon follow and vice versa, thus CPR is the most often performed live-saving procedure in such a situation. 

CPR can be performed by either one or two people, although it is easier if there are two people – one to perform the heart massage and the other to perform the artificial breathing.

Also, you may want to take the time to find your cats sternum and femoral artery before there is a need to know where they are.

Questions to ask before performing CPR

  • Is your cat still breathing? You can determine this by watching the chest for a ‘rise and fall’. You can also put your cheek against the cat’s nose and feel for breath.
  • Does your cat have a pulse? You can determine this by feeling the femoral artery located in the groin, checking the jugular in the neck, or feeling for the heart in the chest.

Use this chart to determine what is necessary to perform:

 

Pulse – Yes

Pulse – No

Breathing – Yes

Heart Massage

Breathing – No

Artificial Breathing

CPR

CPR (artificial breathing with heart massage)

Two Person

  1. Lay your cat on his/her side on a flat surface.
  2. One person should give mouth-to-nose breathing.
    • First clear the mouth of any foreign objects, mucus, or vomit.
    • Pull the tongue forward and close the mouth. Hold the cat’s muzzle closed with your hands.
    • Blow gently into the cat’s nostrils. Blow as forcefully as you need to see the chest rise and fall.
    • Exhale into the animal’s nose at a rate of 15 to 25 breaths per minute (one breath every 2-4 seconds).
  3. The other person should kneel behind the cat at about shoulder level. Place the fingertips and thumb on either side of the sternum, at about the fifth rib, just above and behind the elbows.
  4. Compress the chest wall 1/2 to 3/4 of an inch at a rate of about 60-80 times per minute.
  5. If possible, do not stop heart massage while administering a breathe.
  6. Pause every two minutes for 10 to 15 seconds to check for pulse and spontaneous breathing.
  7. Continue until the heart beats and the cat breathes freely, or until no heartbeat is felt for 30 minutes.

One Person

  1. Lay your cat on his/her side on a flat surface.
  2. Kneel behind the cat at about shoulder level and use one hand (your left hand) to give mouth-to-nose breathing.
    • First clear the mouth of any foreign objects, mucus, or vomit.
    • Pull the tongue forward and close the mouth. Hold the cat’s muzzle closed with your hands.
    • Blow gently into the cat’s nostrils. Blow as forcefully as you need to see the chest rise and fall.
    • Exhale into the animal’s nose at a rate of 15 to 25 breaths per minute (one breath every 2-4 seconds).
  3. With your right-hand place the fingertips and thumb on either side of the sternum, at about the fifth rib, just above and behind the elbows.
  4. Compress the chest wall 1/2 to 3/4 of an inch at a rate of about 60-80 times per minute.
  5. If possible, do not stop heart massage while administering a breathe.
  6. Pause every two minutes for 10 to 15 seconds to check for pulse and spontaneous breathing.
  7. Continue until the heart beats and the cat breathes on its own, or until no heartbeat is felt for 30 minutes.

 

Leave a Reply

Be the First to Comment!

avatar

wpDiscuz
Notice: Trying to get property of non-object in /hermes/bosnaweb09a/b1019/ipg.angoracat/public_html/wp/wp-content/plugins/jetpack/modules/gravatar-hovercards.php on line 238